Stitch Patterns

Attached I have included stitch patterns shown in projects referenced in this blog. The stitches are organized by type: basics, cables, lace, ribs and trim. Stitch libraries that I like are found in the Favorite Books section.

  1. Basics
  2. Cables
  3. Decreases
  4. Increases
  5. Lace
  6. Ribs
  7. Trim

BASICS
StockinetteStockinetteStockinette or Stocking Stitch
Row 1: knit across
Row 2: purl across
Repeat rows 1 & 2.
Illustrated with Fun Fur scarves, the braided headband, and basic sock.

If you are knitting in the round, then you knit every row, rather than alternately knitting and purling rows.

Reverse StockinetteReverse StockinetteReverse Stockinette or Reverse Stocking Stitch
Row 1: purl across
Row 2: knit across
Repeat rows 1 & 2.
Illustrated with Fun Fur scarves, the braided headband, and basic sock.

If you are knitting in the round, then you purl every row, rather than alternately knitting and purling rows. Reverse stockinette stitch as the name implies is there reverse side of the fabric created with stockinette stitch.

Seed Stitch
Row 1: *(K1, P1) across
Row 2: *(P1, K1) across
Repeat rows 1 & 2.
Illustrated with 100 Mile Club Socks.

Basketweave Stitch
Rows 1, 3, 5: K4 P4 across
Rows 2, 4, 6: P4 K4 across
Rows 7, 9, 11: P4 K4 across
Rows 8, 10, 12: K4 P4 across
Predominant stitch of Mechanic's Vest.

CABLES Here you will find the cable patterns that were featured in this blog.
8 Stitch Cable Stitch Patterns
Classic 6 Row Cable (multiple of 6 + 2 stitches):
Rows 1-5: (P2, K6) across
Row 6: (P2, Cable 6) across
Cable 6: (hold 3 sts to back, knit next 3, then knit 3 from cable). Design feature of Cable Ankle Socks.

O X O Cable Pattern (multiple of 12 stitches): This pattern was used in the two versions of the "Hugs and Kisses" wrist warmers: Navy Satin and: Frost Green (shown). It is based on the "O X O X" cable pattern in: Barbara Walker, A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, Schoolhouse Press, 1998, p 255.

Mock Cable or Baby Cable Stitch (multiple of 5 + 3 stitches):
Row 1 - (wrong side)  (K3P2)*              K3
Row 2 - (right side)     (P3 K1 YO K1)*   P3
Row 3 -                       (K3 P3) *             K3
Row 4 - [P3 Sl 1 K2 PSSO2(over the 2 knitted sts)]* P3
PSSO2 means pass the slipped stitch over the two knitted stitches. Illustrated with Leg warmers, baby baseball jacket, baby cap and booties. For variation, you can add more knit (stockinette) stitches between the mock cables. (from The New Lux Knitting Book: Designs for the Whole Family)

DECREASES
SSK: The SSK (slip, slip, knit) is a leftward slanted decrease in which 2 sts are slipped knitwise from the left to right hand needle (twisting the stitches), transferred back to the left hand needle (no twisting), then knitted together through the backs. This is my favorite leftward slanting decrease and is used in socks. Full photos and instructions can be found in the SSK article.

SSP: The SSP (slip, slip, purl) is a rightward slanting decrease on the purl side and a leftward slanting decrease on the knit side of the work. Two (2) sts are slipped knitwise from the left to right hand needle (twisting the stitches), transferred back to the left hand needle (no twisting), then purled together through their backs. This decrease is used in the short rows toe and is worked on the purl side (inside) of the toe up sock, creating a leftward slanting stitch on the good side of the sock. Full photos and instructions can be found in the SSP article.

The SSSP: (slip, slip, slip purl) is a rightward slanting decrease on the purl side and a leftward slanting decrease on the knit side of the work. This stitch is identical to the SSP with the exception that 3, not 2 stitches are slipped and purled together. This decrease is used in the short rows toe and is worked on the purl side (inside) of the toe up sock, creating a leftward slanting stitch on the good side of the sock.

K2tog tbl: Knit 2 together through the back loops is a leftward slanted decrease where the right hand needle is passed through 2 sts on the left hand needle in the direction left to right, knitting the 2 sts together through the back loops. This is similar to the SSK in appearance (leftward slanting), but done in one step. This decrease is used in the Madeira Leaf Stitch (see lace below). Full photos and instructions can be found in the K2tog tbl article.

K2tog 1 K2tog: The K2tog (knit 2 together) is a rightward slanted decrease. The right hand needle is passed through 2 sts on the left hand needle in the direction left to right, knitting the 2 sts together through the fronts. With the exception of passing through 2 sts at once, the K2tog is the same as a regular knit stitch. Full photos and instructions can be found in the K2tog article.



K3tog: The K3tog (knit 3 together) is a rightward slanted decrease used in the short rows toe. It is identical to the K2tog stitch with exception that 3 stitches are worked instead of 2. The right hand needle is passed through 3 sts on the left hand needle in the direction left to right, knitting the 3 sts together through the fronts. With the exception of passing through 3 sts at once, the K2tog is the same as a regular knit stitch. For photos and instructions for this technique refer to K2tog article.

P2tog: The P2tog (purl 2 together) is like the normal purl stitch, but the right hand needle is passed through two stitches at the same time (direction right to left) instead of one.

P2tog tbl (Purl 2 together through back loops): This is a rightward slanting purl stitch, which produces a leftward slanting decrease on the reverse side of the work. This decrease is used in the Madeira Leaf Stitch (see lace below). This is a tricky stitch to understand and if the tension is too tight, difficult to execute. The trick is in how you point the left hand needle when starting this stitch. It is best to look at the photos before attempting this stitch. Full photos and instructions can be found in the P2tog tbl article.

INCREASES
M1 Increase Unlike the yarn over increases used for laces, the make one (M1) stitch is used when you do not want to leave a hole in the work. It is used in the swing coat and is used for the toe increases in the rectangular toe. The horizontal ladder between the stitch just completed and the next stitch is picked up and placed on the left hand needle such that the leading edge of the loop is on the front side of the needle. The loop is then knitted through the back of the stitch to twist it and prevent a hole. Full photos and instructions can be found in the M1 Increase article.

Lifted Increase Left Lifted increases are used when a slanted stitch, but no hole is desired. Both right and left lifted increases are paired for the basic toe up sock gusset. The result is subtle. Both left and right lifted increases are formed by lifting a stitch from one row below and knitting it. In the lifted increase left, a stitch lifted from below the next stitch on the left hand needle is lifted and knitted, followed by knitting the regular stitch. Full photos and instructions can be found in the Lifted Increase Left article.

Lifted Increase Right Lifted increases are used when a slanted stitch, but no hole is desired. Both right and left lifted increases are paired for the basic toe up sock gusset. The result is subtle. Both left and right lifted increases are formed by lifting a stitch from one row below and knitting it. In the lifted increase right, a stitch lifted from below the stitch just completed on the right hand needle is placed on the left hand needle and knitted. Full photos and instructions can be found in the Lifted Increase Right article.

Lace Increases: The Yarn Over increase (YO inc) is used with laces and the direction in which the yarn is wrapped depends on the preceding stitch (K or P) and the subsequent stitch (K or P). It is not as difficult to remember all the combinations as it may at first appear; if you yarn over for the increase in the wrong direction, the yarn slips off as soon as you pick up yarn for the next stitch because you "unwind" the yarn. So, picture the direction the yarn will be drawn for the stitch following the increase and where the yarn needs to be for the subsequent stitch (front or back) to wrap the yarn correctly. This way you won't have to remember all combinations.

YO inc after K before K st: For the YO inc after a K stitch and before a K stitch, the yarn is brought under the right hand needle and wound back to front over the right hand needle to be in the proper position for the subsequent knit stitch. This is one of two YO increases used in the Basic Toe Up Sock - Short Rows Toe. Full photos and instructions can be found in the Yarn Over Increase after Knit, before Knit Stitch article.

YO inc after K before P st: For the YO inc after a K stitch and before a P stitch, the yarn is wound front to back and then brought forward again under the right hand needle to be in the proper position for the subsequent purl stitch. This is one of two YO increases used in the Mock Croc Socks. Full photos and instructions can be found in the Yarn Over increase after a Knit before a Purl Stitch article.

YO inc after P before K st: For the YO inc after a P stitch and before a K stitch, the yarn is wound front to back over the right hand needle. This is one of two YO increases used in the Mock Croc Socks. Full photos and instructions can be found in the Yarn Over Increase after a Purl Before a Knit Stitch article.


YO inc after P before P st: For the YO inc after a P stitch and before a P stitch, the yarn is brought to the back under the right hand needle and wound back to front over the right hand needle to be in the proper position for the subsequent purl stitch. This is one of two YO increases used in the Basic Toe Up Sock - Short Rows Toe. Full photos and instructions can be found in the Yarn Over Increase after a Purl Before a Purl Stitch article.

LACE
Eyelet row (for baby layette): in 1 x 1 ribbing: P1K1 (K1 YO K2tog)* K1
Illustrated with baby cap and booties. (from The New Lux Knitting Book: Designs for the Whole Family)


Baby Fern LaceBaby Fern: (multiple of 12 sts)
This 6 row pattern uses leftward and rightward slanted decreases (SSK, k2tog) and yarn overs. Click here for instructions: Baby Fern Stitch.



Madeira Leaf Stitch, variant with a garter stitch ground: (multiple of 10 plus 4 stitches)
Illustrated with baby bonnet and stitch pattern discussion. This 48 row pattern uses YOs and two slanted decreases: P2tog tbl and k2tog tbl with a garter stitch ground.



RIBS
Rib stitch: There are many variations of rib stitch, a fitted stitch with considerable stretch horizontally. It is used for cuffs, waistbands, fit, and decoration. When knit in the round, 2 row patterns like 1x1 and 2x2 ribs, become single row (row 1) patterns.

1 x 1 Rib1 x 1 rib: (multiple of 1 + 1 stitches)Used for cuffs in 100 Mile Club Socks
Row 1: (K1 P1)* across
Row 2: (P1 K1)* across (The knit stitches of row 1 are purled and the purl stitches knitted.)
Repeat rows 1 & 2 to desired length.


When you are knitting flat (back & forth), on row 2 (side 2) the purl stitch from row 1 looks like a knit stitch, so you are actually knitting a knit stitch and following the pattern across of repeating what you see. If you are knitting in the round, then you only use Row 1 and repeat it until the desired length is reached.

2x2 Rib2 x 2 rib: (multiple of 2 + 2 stitches)
Used for cuffs in Cable Ankle Socks.
Row 1: (K2 P2)* across
Row 2: (P2 K2)* across (The knit stitches of row 1 are purled and the purl stitches knitted.)
Repeat rows 1 & 2 to desired length.

3 x 2 rib: (multiple of 3 + 2 stitches), 6 row repeat pattern, lace rib
See the Mock Croc Socks article for information on purchasing the Knit Picks exclusive sock pattern.

TRIM
I-cord TieI-cord TieI-cord: As a child I created tubes by corking with a tool made from a wooden sewing spool, with nail posts driven in to hold stitches. A crochet needle was used to advance the work, whose tail snaked out the bottom of the spool. Were adults trying to keep me busy?
Today I use DPNs, which create I-cords at warp speed in comparison. Most commonly, I-cords are a 3 stitch pattern. This is one of those "then the magic happens" concepts that is easier to understand by picking up a pair of DPNs and trying it. To make I-cords with more stitches, just cast on the desired amount and follow the directions below, changing the "3" to the number of stitches you have cast on.

Step 1: cast 3 sts on a DPN
Step 2: K3
Step 3: Slide these 3 sts to the opposite end of the same needle. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the I-cord is the desired length. Cast off.

When you slide the stitches to the other end of the needle, the yarn feed is as far away from the stitch nearest the needle point as it can be. The action of knitting with the yarn from the other end of the needle will pull the first and last stitches together to create a tube. With this method you can quickly make different size tubes by adding a stitch or two to the pattern or using heavier yarn and larger needles.

The 3-stitch I-cord is illustrated with baby booties and I-Cord Tie and a 12-stitch pattern with the braided headband.